Miami River 5th Street Bridge

Miami River 5th Street Bridge: Finished control tower.
Miami River 5th Street Bridge: Finished control tower.
Miami River 5th Street Bridge: Finished control tower.
Miami River 5th Street Bridge: Finished control tower.
Miami River 5th Street Bridge: Finished control tower.
Miami River 5th Street Bridge: Control tower ready for silicate coating.
Miami River 5th Street Bridge: Control tower ready for silicate coating.
Miami River 5th Street Bridge: Rolling on the Royalan Grob base coat.
Miami River 5th Street Bridge
Pictured above:

Finished control tower with KEIM Royalan silicate coating system.


About This Project

Challenges With the robust precast concrete construction, the most prominent challenge was maintaining the control tower amidst shrinking budgets for the next 80 years. Concerns of the design team: how to maintain a clean facade against wind-blown dust, algae and lichen propagation, soiling from automobile and ship traffic, fading color over time, weather protection from rain, and keeping the concrete dry from rising damp.
Solutions A decorative coating system that would allow moisture from rising damp or failed caulking or flashings to freely escape, prevent wind-driven rain from penetrating into the concrete, that would not attract dirt and remain clean, and remain colorfast. KEIM Concrete Cleaner was used to prepare the surfaces and remove form release oils, a base coat of KEIM Royalan Grob applied to fill hairline cracks and equalize the surface texture, and a finish coat of KEIM Royalan over the Grob.
Architect H2L2 Architects & Planners LLC
714 Market St Suite 600
Philadelphia, PA 19106
Contractor Kiewit Southern
528 NW 7th Ave
Miami, FL 33136
Applicator Gemstone LLC
1010 Kennedy Drive Suite 406
Key West, FL 33040
Type of Project Municipal/Government
Customer Florida Department of Transportation
Location Miami, Florida (United States)
Regional Info

Miami has a tropical monsoon climate with hot and humid summers and short, warm winters, with a marked drier season in the winter.  Its sea-level elevation, coastal location, position just above the Tropic of Cancer, and proximity to the Gulf Stream shapes its climate.  With January averaging 67.2 °F (19.6 °C), winter features mild to warm temperatures; cool air usually settles after the passage of a cold front, which produces much of the little amount of rainfall.  Lows sometimes fall below 50 °F (10 °C), but very rarely below 35 °F (2 °C).  Highs generally range between 70–77 °F (21–25 °C).  The wet season begins sometime in May, ending in mid-October.  During this period, temperatures are in the mid 80s to low 90s (29–35 °C), accompanied by high humidity, though the heat is often relieved by afternoon thunderstorms or a sea breeze that develops off the Atlantic Ocean, which then allow lower temperatures, but conditions still remain very muggy.  Much of the year's 55.9 inches (1,420 mm) of rainfall occurs during this period.


Hurricane season officially runs from June 1 through November 30, although hurricanes can develop beyond those dates.  The most likely time for Miami to be hit is during the peak of the Cape Verde season which is mid-August through the end of September.   Although tornadoes are uncommon in the Miami area, a tornado struck the city in 1925 and again in 1997.


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