Saint Matthews German Evangelical Lutheran Church

Saint Matthews German Evangelical Lutheran Church: St. Matthews German Evangelical Lutheran Church, Sanctuary, Charleston, SC
Saint Matthews German Evangelical Lutheran Church: Elastomeric failure--non vapor permeable elastomeric finish was peeling in sheets because of hydrostatic pressure from moisture vapor in historic masonry load-bearing walls.
Saint Matthews German Evangelical Lutheran Church: Elastomeric failure
Saint Matthews German Evangelical Lutheran Church: Existing Portland stucco with myriad hairline and larger cracks after removal of elastomeric finish.
Saint Matthews German Evangelical Lutheran Church: Damaged existing stucco finish.
Saint Matthews German Evangelical Lutheran Church: Existing stucco finish in disrepair.
Saint Matthews German Evangelical Lutheran Church: Historic brick, load-bearing walls.
Saint Matthews German Evangelical Lutheran Church: Existing load-bearing masonry walls.
Saint Matthews German Evangelical Lutheran Church: Stucco was repaired and replaced with KEIM Universalputz Historic Stucco Mix and finished to match texture and color of original exterior finish.
Saint Matthews German Evangelical Lutheran Church
Saint Matthews German Evangelical Lutheran Church
Saint Matthews German Evangelical Lutheran Church: Interior plaster walls and ceiling are painted with Innotop High Hiding Mineral Silicate Paint.  Blue is Optil Designer Mineral Silicate Paint.
Saint Matthews German Evangelical Lutheran Church: Beautiful blue paint is Optil Designer Interior Mineral Silicate Paint custom matched to original blue wall paint.
Saint Matthews German Evangelical Lutheran Church: Innotop High Hiding Interior Mineral Silicate Paint
Saint Matthews German Evangelical Lutheran Church
Saint Matthews German Evangelical Lutheran Church: Stunning LED lighting effects on exterior.  Mineral silicate paint finish refracts light for a beautiful
Saint Matthews German Evangelical Lutheran Church
Pictured above: St. Matthews German Evangelical Lutheran Church, Sanctuary, Charleston, SC

About This Project

With a rich history and designation in Charleston as a Category 1 building of historical prominance, a project was begun in 2012 to restore the interior and exterior of the sancturary, following the Secretary of Interiors guidelines for historic restoration.  The exterior stucco had received an elastomeric paint in the 1990's to help weatherproof and hide myriad cracks in the stucco surface.  Stucco surfaces ranged from the early 1900's original lime stucco to various lime/cement stuccos that had been applied as patches.  After a devastating fire in 1965 caused severe damage to the steeple and roof, much of the front and sides of the sanctuary received new Portland stucco, which was considerably harder than the soft masonry, load bearing walls beneath.  


 

Challenges Years of severe moisture intrusion and damage left the interior plaster surface badly damaged and the exterior masonry in very poor condition. Improperly installed flashing and the badly cracked exterior stucco, added to the water incursion. In addition, several structural cracks were identified and walls rebuilt to help eliminate future issues. Elastomeric paint had bubbled, blistered and peeled of large areas. Three distinct eras of stucco were noted, as was a severe loss of adhesion to the historic masonry walls. More than 80% of the stucco had delaminated from the surface, requiring a change to the original plan to patch the existing stucco and repaint with a vapor permeable mineral silicate paint finish.
Solutions After significant testing to determine the physical properties of the existing historic stucco, brick and masonry, a recommendation was made to remove loose stucco and repair the surface with Universalputz Standard Render which very closely matched the composition and physical properties of the historic masonry and remaining, intact stucco. Lime mortar was raked out and repointed using an historic mix mortar. Universalputz was installed directly onto the historic surface and raised to a level even with abutting and existing stucco. Mineral fiber mesh was installed to add flexural strength in the second layer of render. A final 3/8" layer of render was installed over the entire surface, with a texture that matched the original historic stucco. The front and sides of the stucco surface were struck with joints to resemble the original scoring. Royalan Severe Weather Exterior Mineral Finish was applied to the surface to provide the final color and appearance. Interior plaster was repaired and finished with Keim Innotop on ceilings and walls and Keim Optil for decorating accents. These mineral silicate wall paints are vapor permeable and will allow interior walls to breathe naturally, while providing a noncombustible, scrub-resistant finish for years to come.
Architect Marshall Clarke, MCA Architecture, http://www.designmca.com/
Historic Consultant: Dorothy Krtozer, Building Conservation Associates, http://www.bcausa.com/
Contractor Hill Construction, www.hillcon.com
Applicator First Exteriors, http://www.firstext.com/
Type of Project Places of Worship
Customer Saint Matthews German Evangelical Lutheran Church
Location Charleston, South Carolina (United States)
Regional Info