CREC Discovery Academy

CREC Discovery Academy: CREC Discovery Academy
CREC Discovery Academy
CREC Discovery Academy
CREC Discovery Academy
CREC Discovery Academy
Pictured above: CREC Discovery Academy

About This Project

The building underwent extensive remediation and deconstruction to ready it for additions and renovations.  The 1960's area brick facade was in good condition with minimal spalling and hair-line cracks however its appearance and yellow color did not fit the scheme of the modern building it would be.
Challenges Products to be used for the renovation were required to be long-lasting, durable and sustainable and offer long-term economy. Also the designers did not want the brick to look old or covered by a thick paint layer, but hoped for a more uniform appearance across multiple types of surfaces.
Solutions Royalan Extreme Weather Mineral Silicate Finish was chosen for its weather resistant durability and long-term and economic life cycle, the fact that it will never blister or peel from the surface and that the color will not fade, even on southern and western exposures.
Architect Amenta Emma Architects
www.amentaemma.com
Contractor Downes Construction
www.downesco.com
Applicator MacKenzie Painting
www.themackenziecos.com
Type of Project Schools/Institutional
Customer Capitol Region Education Counsel
Location Weathersfield, Connecticut (United States)
Regional Info

News/Announcements

Discovery academy completed for the 2015/2016 school year

The new, three-story $35 million dollar school at 176 Cumberland Ave., built on the site of a disused Northeast Utilities building, touts a futuristic design including green and silver panels arranged in patterns on the building's sides and an artful rain roof leading to the bus dropoff. The facility is surrounded by freshly landscaped open spaces, including a soccer field and nature trails, and a playscape is planned.

The facility is energy-efficient and sustainable. It will eventually feature a roof garden and solar arrays, which will provide about 30 percent of its electricity, each pre-kindergarten room opens into an area with planting beds and a rain barrel to allow pupils to grow flowers and vegetables.

The academy, one of 19 interdistrict magnet schools operated by the Capitol Region Education Council, focuses on science, technology, engineering and math, also known as STEM. For its first four years, the elementary school was crammed into two locations on Franklin and Huyshope avenues in Hartford and lacked basic facilities such as art and music rooms.